Blog Posts by Uncategorized

Anonymous's picture

Now it's Wyoming

From the Blogjunction listserv, on savvy marketing to focus on libraries: The Wyoming Libraries Campaign. Similar in scope to Washington's efforts from my previous post on creating a recognizable, fun, and innovative way of showcasing the importance of libraries.

Memo

    Anonymous's picture

    Writing (Concisely) for the Web

    People don’t read web pages.

    Perhaps it’s because the web puts so much content within our grasp, we’re rarely satisfied to read a page from top to bottom before we veer of in a different direction via hyperlink.

    The following are guidelines I adhere to when writing for the web:

    • Recognize the structure in documents and make it apparent.
      • Use bullet lists, such as this, to organize lists.
      • Use HTML’s heading tags. They promote organized and logical documents, and can improve your search engine rankings, too. Here’s an example usage:
        • H1 for page titles
        • H2 for section headings
        • H3 for subsection headings
        • And so on…
    • Use consistent styles and formatting. Once a user learns your layout, they can take that knowledge to any page in your site.
    • Get the main point across in your first sentence.

    Interested in learning more? Here is a collection of articles on writing for the web.

    Anonymous's picture

    importance of Idaho libraries

    The 17th Annual Idaho Public Policy Survey, conducted by Boise State University and released in January 2006, included the question “Overall, how important are libraries in our state?” The responses (n=534, with a +/- error of 4%) showed 77.2% choosing “very important” and 20.5% choosing “somewhat important”. Only 0.2% choose “not important at all”.

    Fast forward to February 7th — three library bond elections failed (Boise, Lewiston, & Twin Falls). I read that there was low voter turn-out, too many people dislike the property tax, and we don’t need libraries because we have the Internet.

    Anonymous's picture

    Hello World!

    Welcome to the Idaho Library Futures 2020 Vision Think Tank blog.

      Anonymous's picture

      Audio from Joe Janes

      Many of you heard Joe Janes, iSchool professor from my alma mater the University of Washington, at the Think Tank talking about libraries and the issues surrounding future changes to library services. If you liked his talk, you can now hear Joe talk about Google in the first inaugural online radio show from the iSchool, called InfoSpeak.org.

      Anonymous's picture

      Branding: OCLC report

      Here's more on how people view libraries. We have our work cut out for us. (in case you lack time to read the entire report, look at the conclusion and then work your way back).

      OCLC Perceptions

        Anonymous's picture

        Googlezon video

        Way back in the Think Tank we were shown a video titled “Googlezon” (EPIC 2014) which partly blew my socks off and partly gave me déjà vu. We know Google is putting together a massive grid of innovative and creative services, and will get even more powerful as they partner with institutions like the Library of Congress or spearhead online content-enrichment services like Google Base. Anyhow, I enjoyed watching the video once again and thought others out there would too:

        Anonymous's picture

        Technology as a verb

        Read this post from A Wandering Eyre. Jane talks of her Freshman Comp class learning to use the library. Asked to come up with synonyms for “technology,” they surprised her:

        “These students, about 8 years younger than myself, think of what they do with technology as opposed to the object of technology. Their attitudes are completely different than what I expected.”

        Anonymous's picture

        Future of libraries

        In today's link of the day (Library Link of the Day) we find Tom Frey from the DaVinci Institute's view of the future.

        In it, there are trends to heed and advice for libraries. The advice is to

        1. Evaluate the library experience
        2. Embrace new information technologies
        Anonymous's picture

        European visions

        Came across this article via ResourceShelf on the efforts of the European Union’s “European Commission responsible for Information Society and Media” and a conference titled “The Role of Libraries in the Information Society”, which took place in Luxembourg on September 29, 2005. The commissioner, Viviane Reding, gives an illuminating overview of the challenges and importance of libraries as they grapple with questions of access, digitization efforts, and relevance.

        In her address, she outlines an initiative called i2010, which aims to “provide[s] a framework to address the main challenges facing the Information Society and media sectors in the next 5 years.”